Archaeological Tell

0 Endangered Tells: Tell el-Far’ah

Tell el-Far’ah (south) only rises 20 meters above its surroundings, but stands out from a great distance. The identification of this tell, which extends over about 16 acres and has 14 layers, with Sharuhen is far from definite. William Matthew Flinders Petrie, the father of archaeological research in the Land…

0 Massively Excavated Tells: Tel Megiddo

Excavations have been conducted at Tel Megiddo in the Jezreel Valley for over a century, starting in 1902. They began with the German Society for Oriental Research’s excavation led by Gottlieb Schumacher. From 1925 to 1939, during the British Mandate, the Oriental Institute of Chicago excavated the site. From 1960…

0 Unexcavated Tells: Tel Hannaton

Tel Hannaton sits at the southern reaches of the Bet Natofa Valley alongside the Natofa reservoir and the road leading to Kibbutz Hannaton. Ceramic shards collected at the tell indicate that it was settled from the Bronze Age until the time of the Mishna and Talmud. It apparently was the…

0 Small Tells: Tel Qashish

Tel Qashish is one of a number of small tells scattered in the Jezreel Valley. Its biblical name is not known. Archaeologist Yohanan Aharoni proposed identifying it as Helkath, which appears in the list of cities that pharaoh Thutmose III conquered in his war against the coalition of Canaanite kings.…

0 Green Tells: Tel Hazor

Tel Hazor extends over 200 acres, making it the largest archaeological tell in Israel. Thanks to its location in the Hula Valley and archaeological findings, it has been identified as the biblical city of Hazor, which is first mentioned in the Egyptian Execration texts from the nineteenth century BCE and…

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